Fine Art Photography Printing

Video clip Score: 1 / five

Naturally Orkney named as the favorite Scottish Nature Photography Book

A book dealing with the wild species of Orkney has been brought up as Scotlands Favorite Scottish Nature Photography Book of 2014. The book – Naturally Orkney – is the work of Raymond Besant, a wildlife photographer and cameraman. It was published by The Orcadian previous year.

The vote via the internet is arranged every 2 years by Scottish Nature Photography Awards that celebrate wildlife, nature as well as landscape photography in that country. A leading website reported that Raymond Besant told that he is more than happy that Naturally Orkney has won this honor.  He loved working on the snaps, trying out all new techniques, observing animal behaviour, and also bringing Orkneys wildlife to a wider audience so they could relish this too.

Winter in Glen Lyon, a book by Jamie Grant (which is published by Aberfeldy Watermill) took the 2nd position in the vote, and Otters: Return to the River, a book by Anna Levin and Laurie Campbell (published by Birlinn), took the third position.

Learn Digital Photography – How to become a photographer

Video clip Ranking: 5 / 5

**How To Do Trick Photography And Special Effects**| Trick Photography And Special Effects Review!

Movie Score: / 5

Wildlife Photographer of the Year set to start at the Royal Ontario Museum

The Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibit starts on 22nd November, 2014, Saturday, at Royal Ontario Museum. The exhibit makes its debut in Canada at the Royal Ontario Museum where it would be on showcase till 22nd March, 2015. Wildlife Photographer of the Year is the most prestigious wildlife photography competition of its kind and it displays the most astonishing images of the natural world.

Now in its 50th year, the contest attracts entries from across the world from both pro and amateur photographers. The winning entries are featured in the exhibit and it is selected by an international judges panel depending on artistry, technical complexity and creativity. The winning Canadian entries, this year, from photographers Jess Findlay and Nick Hawkins, feature snaps from Earth’s Diversity, Birds category.

The Wildlife Photographer of the Year is on showcase in the Garfield Weston Exhibition Hall, the place where the snaps are installed with light boxes making a dramatic view of natural world. The exhibit adds family friendly features like interactive games, hands-on activities, nature facts, fun wildlife and more.

The Royal Ontario Museum’s director and chief executive officer Janet Carding told that Wildlife Photographer of the Year is a great scope for visitors of all ages to experience the power and beauty of wildlife and nature. We expect that the exhibition, as well as interactive learning experiences inspire Wildlife Photographer of the Year visitors to learn more about the natural world and conservation.

The Fine Art Photography of Timothy Leistner

Video Rating: 5 / five

Military Police Photography 1965 US Army Training Film; Basic Photography

Video clip Score: 5 / 5

Fine Art Photography: Elmore Photography

Video clip Rating: / five

Photography holds Hanson an in perfect frame of mind

Eddie Hanson has always seen the world with the eyes of a photographer, since his dad presented him his very first camera around sixty years ago – it was a Burke & James 2 ¼ × 3 ¼ – as well as twenty seconds of instructions on how to use it.
He was eleven year old that time. Hanson ran down to Social Street’s Yvonne’s camera shop where the kind man who used to sit behind the counter showed him how to insert the film as well as adjust the lens settings.
Hanson told that after that he went over to old St. James Hotel and began taking snaps from the veranda, and he fell in love with it. Having that camera in his hand felt very natural, like he had always done it.
He has studied the various parts of the camera and also read as much as he could regarding photography, knowing about depth, composition and light. More than that he also had the great fortune of being called for under the wing of a pro newspaper photographer who used to work for Woonsocket Call at that point of time.
Eddie Hanson told that as he walked up to him while he was taking snaps one day and said ‘hey, you look like you know what you’re doing.’ After that he took him up to the photo room of the Call and he taught him how to develop negative to prints. That point, he realized that photography and camera were to be with him for the rest of his life and he just kept on doing it.

Eddie Hanson has always seen the world with the eyes of a photographer, since his dad presented him his very first camera around sixty years ago – it was a Burke & James 2 ¼ × 3 ¼ – as well as twenty seconds of instructions on how to use it.

He was eleven year old that time. Hanson ran down to Social Street’s Yvonne’s camera shop where the kind man who used to sit behind the counter showed him how to insert the film as well as adjust the lens settings.

Hanson told that after that he went over to old St. James Hotel and began taking snaps from the veranda, and he fell in love with it. Having that camera in his hand felt very natural, like he had always done it.

He has studied the various parts of the camera and also read as much as he could regarding photography, knowing about depth, composition and light. More than that he also had the great fortune of being called for under the wing of a pro newspaper photographer who used to work for Woonsocket Call at that point of time.

Eddie Hanson told that as he walked up to him while he was taking snaps one day and said ‘hey, you look like you know what you’re doing.’ After that he took him up to the photo room of the Call and he taught him how to develop negative to prints. That point, he realized that photography and camera were to be with him for the rest of his life and he just kept on doing it.

Modern Art Photography-Gustav Vigeland

Video Rating: 5 / five